Byte Publication cover pages - the collection

#1

A resource I use for man-cave artworks. some good canvas prints hanging on the wall. The drawing technique is so unique and topics are still relevant today.
My current ones hanging are…

http://www.vintagefreeware.com/bytecvrs.htm

http://www.vintagefreeware.com/1977.pdf

Richard

p.s. the original was ‘Byte Magazine’ but I cant bring myself to using a ‘Z’ in a word… just looks wrong :smiley:

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#2

Very nice - I took a look at 1993’s covers (for no special reason) and then at 1980’s. I can conclude that I’m very much more a 1980 kind of person!

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#3

Which ones resonate with me… I cant specify year; so many memory points over all the years from 1982 onwards…

January 1982 - and IBM PC with two floppy drives… added a 10MB full height hard drive to replace one of the folppy drives.

Dcember 1984 - The modem; I was a BBS sysOp. The days when 100MB of Public Donamin files was weeks of fun… Getting FidoNET type mail system setup

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#4

Oh yes, first modem was quite a defining moment! I never ran a BBS, and only very briefly used one: IIRC I joined up specifically to ask for a necessary library so my Amiga could speak TCP/IP… once I’d got that I never needed to go back. I think that might make me some kind of parasite!

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#5

I find it interesting that it’s the 1988 issues that really start to use the machines themselves as the cover story. Earlier issues were about overlying concepts like Smalltalk or Lisp or text files. Seems the late 1980s are when Byte takes a turn to being more of a hardware review magazine. Which is unfortunate because they were at their strength when they reviewed concepts.

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#6

I preferred the futuristic visions of the drawings… the earlier covers (1975) are really uninspiring :smiley:

http://www.digibarn.com/collections/mags/byte-covers/index.html

Richard

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#7

This is a good issue and a good cover:

Contents page:

#8

Reminds me… there is a recration on a photo of that cover


From https://www.galacticstudios.org/recreating-another-byte-magazine-cover-as-a-photograph/

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#9

Coincidentally, I was trying convince a friend that it was a good idea to build a smart home around one of my PDP-11s just this afternoon.

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A survey of room-sized computers
#10

Also: the 90s covers are rather boring. For me – picture and layout-wise – the sweet spot is definitely the 80s. :slight_smile:

#12

Especially if they’re willing to dedicate a couple of solar panels just for the controller hardware.

#13

The idea of a canvas printout of the Smalltalk Cover is…compelling.

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#14

@craigmaloney That isn’t coincidental. That was an intentional change in editorial direction. It was also the cause for Steve Ciarcia to leave and create Circuit Cellar Ink. Here’s his story http://circuitcellar.com/how-it-all-began/
Here’s the most relevant quote " Consequently, they decided to change BYTE’s editorial direction to be more and more PC-centric—especially no more Robert Tinney covers. As you might guess, a “hardware hacker” column (their term) like mine was incompatible with their new commercial view of life. One of the “Circuit Cellar” projects was indeed a full IBM PC-clone, but I wasn’t ready for “generic” computing yet. When asked if I wanted to “stay on” and review equipment instead of making “hacker” (their word) projects, I smiled and declined."

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#15

The covers are great. I’ve always loved them, mostly the Robert Tinney ones. But even better, you can get complete scans of (I think) every issue! Some of the scans have a few missing or unreadable pages, but out of 8000 pages or so total, it’s a very small percentage:
https://www.americanradiohistory.com/Byte_Magazine.htm
BTW, there are LOTS of other magazines there, too including Radio Electronics, Popular Electronics (Altair issue!), and many others, not just American.

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